Early Industry

Location

41 Main St South
St George On

Painted by Betty & Scott Summerhayes and Family 

One of the initial reasons for the founding of St. George in 1814 was industry. In the early 1800’s, Ontarian natural resources were a prized product all over Canada and abroad. St. George was an integral part of this trade.

Standing amid fields, near to the swiftly-flowing Grand River, St. George was the model of a settlers’ town. It boasted mills to grind farmer’s grain into flour and feed, sawmills, blacksmiths, and manufacturing facilities.  One particularly prominent gristmill stood on the outskirts of St. George, a symbol of the sophistication of the town. St. George also possessed numerous manufacturing factories, creating such items as wagon wheels, sleighs and agricultural machinery.   

This quilt block features a motif of crossed wrenches, sable, on a ruby field, surmounted by a toothed gear. The wrenches are just one example of the tools and agricultural implements created in St. George; what says “industry” as well as a gear? Whether part of a carriage or a separate product, gears are a major component of industry world-wide and in St. George, too.

Hosted by: 
Chris and Bill Janssen
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